Oct 292013
 

I’ve written about this phrase before, but my thoughts have evolved.

Nowadays, I dish out “good girl” as a compliment happily, freely. (Thanks, V, for teaching me how fun it can be!)

I’m still conflicted about it.

I don’t like the “daddy” aspects of it. I know they resonate powerfully for many women, but they scare me. I want your service, your obedience, your compliance. But I don’t want to imagine you as my daughter, me as your father. At. All.

And/but, I now freely enjoy providing and collecting the incremental thrill it provides (so many) women to be rewarded with these words. I’ve seen it, over and over: somehow, when I say “good girl” (or even simply “GG,” as I often said/wrote to V) it activates something so fucking hot in so many women, I’m willing to overlook all the ways it squicks me out just to know it makes your pussy tingle, your clit vibrate, to earn that from me.

And it makes my cock (so) hard to do that to you, to take that from you.

  10 Responses to “Good girl”

  1. yes, good girl really works for me. i wanna be approved of so badly, i wanna please.
    i like daddy too. i can totally understand how it could make someone uncomfortable. for me, its totally divorced from my own father yet has connotations of power and protection, a word imbued with meaning relieved of personal context, the way i might use the word god, loosely. sometimes it just tumbles naturally out of my mouth.
    i like to invoke a feeling but im not interested in incest play (um, not that theres anything wrong with that -?- i guess)

  2. I am neither good nor a girl. It’s refreshing to read about someone who realizes not all women like to specialize the word ‘daddy’. I love my dad but don’t want to think of him when I’m getting my groove on.

    • For what it’s with, I don’t think very many women – even those who like the word – do. I think they’ve achieved something you and I haven’t. They’ve allowed their associations with the word to broaden, the primary sense to recede, and instead, for them, it conjures not their fathers, but the things we imagine fathers provide, generically, in fantasy.

      This seems healthy to me.

      I’m just not there.

  3. Re my previous comment, I meant sexualize the word ‘daddy’ not specialize. Sorry

  4. Yep, those words do it for me, too. I shiver just reading them here. (Particularly here.)

  5. You’re right, good boy!

  6. I discovered I quite like hearing I satisfied my sexual partner… and those words convey that notion very efficiently. But I could never use “daddy” in a sexual context. Just not my thing!

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